Digital Conference 2018 2018-08-23T23:17:23+00:00
Center for the Study of Religion, Culture, and Foreign Affairs

2018 Digital Conference

Rethink. Reframe. Respond.

Rethinking Public Diplomacy:
Addressing Divisive Propaganda In Political Discourse

September 27, 2018

Online Webinar Conference

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cludigitalconference.com

A Digital Conference on Foreign Affairs

The world has seen major disruptive changes occurring at increasing rates of speed for many decades. The changes have been technological, cultural, political and social. Many of our long-held models and worldviews and maps of how to see and make sense of the world no longer work. The inclusion of the study and impact of culture and religion can be a major step in creating new maps of how the world really is and how to navigate its complexity and interconnectedness and for the important field of foreign affairs. We are choosing six lenses with which to view these changes and how the role of the study of religion and culture can make an impact and help create new useful maps for a new, very different future.

  • Exponential technological innovation, speed and change
  • Globalization, mass migrations, immigration diversity
  • Proliferation of social movements impacting values and beliefs
  • Worldwide rise of right wing extremism in reaction to change
  • Skills and labor shortages projected in near future globally
  • Global economic and political instability and uncertainty

For questions regarding the 2017 Digital Conference please contact us at info@claremontlincoln.edu

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All sessions will be live streamed online. Register to have the link to the live stream feed emailed to you prior to the start of the conference.

Darrell Ezell, Ph.D.

Darrell Ezell, Ph.D.

Founding Director, Center for the Study of Religion, Culture and Foreign Affairs

Darrell Ezell, Ph.D., is Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dean of the Interfaith Action program and Director for the Center for Religion, Culture, and Foreign Affairs at Claremont Lincoln University. His research and teaching areas of interest include interfaith relations and diplomacy, peacemaking, religious pluralism and state/non-state actor relations. He has held academic positions at Tulane and Louisiana State Universities and worked at the U.S. Department of State, Clinton Foundation, Interfaith Worker Justice and the Interfaith Center of New York. He is author of Beyond Cairo: U.S. Engagement with the Muslim World (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), which is based on his dissertation at University of Birmingham (U.K.), where he earned a joint Ph.D. from the departments of Theology & Religion and American Studies.

Keith Burton

Dr. Keith Burton

Director, Center for Adventist-Muslim Relations at Oakwood University in Huntsville, Alabama

Keith Burton, Ph.D., Heads the Center for Adventist-Muslim Relations at Oakwood University (CAMROU), where he also teaches in the School of Religion. CAMROU's innovative approach to interfaith bridge-building draws from research, social activities and humanitarian initiatives to form lasting relationships between members of the Muslim and Christian communities. Before assuming this position, Dr. Burton served as an adjunct facilitator of religion at the Adventist University of Health Sciences and task evaluator for Western Governors University. He is also the founder and president of Life emPowerment, Inc., a 501(c) 3 organization that encourages individual responsibility and community cooperation. He holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Religious and Theological Studies from Northwestern University.

Dr. Anne Marie Choup

Dr. Anne Marie Choup

Faculty, Department of Political Science at The University of Alabama in Huntsville

Dr. Anne Marie Choup has been on the faculty of the Department of Political Science since 2007. Before coming to UAH, she taught classes at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at Mills College in Oakland, California. Her expertise spans a wide range of topics, including the politics of Latin American and developing nations, African development, the United Nations, and American politics. Dr. Choup's scholarly publications explore the ways in which grassroots organizations work together to make demands on the state. She has published in Development and Change (2003), International Political Science Review (2006), Journal of Civil Society (2006), Social Movement Studies (2008), and Politics (2010). She has presented research papers at the Latin American Studies Association Congress, the African Studies Association Meetings, and both the Western and the American Political Science Associations' annual meetings. Her current research focuses on the political stances of the Catholic Church in Latin America. Dr. Choup's research has been funded by the American Political Science Association, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council.

Katherine Marshall

Katherine Marshall

Senior Fellow, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

Katherine Marshall has worked for four decades in international development, focusing on the world’s poorest countries. She is a senior fellow at Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs and Professor in the Practice in the School of Foreign Service. In addition to teaching that focuses on ethical dimensions of international development she is engaged in various research projects on ways in which religious beliefs, institutions, and leaders affect international development. She is executive director of the World Faiths Development Dialogue, an NGO born in the World Bank whose mission is to bridge the gulfs that separate the worlds of development and religion. She spent a large part of her career at the World Bank, in many leadership assignments focused on Africa, Latin America, and East Asia. From 2000 – 2006, she was counselor to the Bank’s president on ethics, values, and faith in development. She holds various board positions currently including the World Bank Community Connections Fund, AVINA Americas, the Opus Prize Foundation, and the Washington National Cathedral Foundation and served recently as a Trustee of Princeton University. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is a visiting professor at the University of Cambodia. She is the author of several books and many articles, most recently Global Institutions of Religion: Ancient Movers, Modern Shakers, published by Routledge in 2013. She writes regularly for the Huffington Post.

Dr. Vincent L. Wimbush

Dr. Vincent L. Wimbush

Scholar of Religion & Director, Institute for Signifying Scriptures

VINCENT L. WIMBUSH, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized scholar of religion, intellectual leader, and academic gadfly, with more than thirty years of advanced graduate-level teaching and research experience. He is author/editor of more than twelve books, including White Men’s Magic: Scripturalization as Slavery; MisReading America: Scriptures and Difference; Theorizing Scriptures; and African Americans and the Bible; and scores of articles and essays. He is founding director of The Institute for Signifying Scriptures (ISS) (www.signifyingscriptures.org), an international scholarly organization, and is conceptualizer and director of several collaborative trans-disciplinary research projects, including a documentary film (Finding God in the City of Angels) on the ethnography of scriptures. Recipient of numerous awards and research grants, he is past president of the Society of Biblical Literature. Wimbush’s general teaching and research interests focus on the trans-disciplinary and comparative study of “scriptures” as sharp wedge for critical research and theorizing in the politics of language, social formation, consciousness, and orientation. His particular area of expertise turns around the uses of scriptures in the historical and contemporary circum-Black Atlantic as window onto the larger comparative phenomena and dynamics of scripturalizing and scripturalization.

Dr. Lawrence E. Carter, Sr.

Dr. Lawrence E. Carter, Sr.

Dean of the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel
Professor of Religion, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA

In 1958 Martin Luther King Jr. privately recruited Lawrence Edward Carter as a 10th grader to come to Morehouse College. Twenty-one years later, Lawrence Carter became the first Dean of the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel in 1979. Today he is a tenured Professor of Religion and College Archivist and Curator at Morehouse College. For fifty-six years, Carter has studied and worked in fourteen American universities, colleges, and professional schools, spoken at over one hundred different colleges, universities, and seminaries, and received more than one thousand speaking engagements from eighteen Christian denominations, including Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, and Buddhist communions, and traveled to thirty-eight foreign countries. He has made more than a hundred radio and television appearances, including continent wide in Africa, Australia, Canada, China, India, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Oceania, Singapore, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

A. D. Faulkner

A. D. Faulkner

Founder/CEO, Global Strategists Association, Chicago, IL

A. D. Faulkner, is the founder of Global Strategists Association (GSA). GSA work to increase Global Engagement among Blacks. In August of 2016 GSA launched its Global Fellows Program. The inaugural class includes Amara Enyia, Kashay Sanders and Emile Cambry. GSA has hosted several thought provoking events designed to increase dialogue and engage thought leaders on today's most pressing issues. Ms. Faulkner’s professional experience includes work for financial institutions such as BMO, Bank of America and J.P. Morgan Chase. Ms. Faulkner is a sought after leader, speaker, thought leader and advisor. She participated in a Festival of Thinkers Conference in Abu Dhabi, UAE; she has spoken on leadership at leading institutions; as a student, she was on the Dean’s Multicultural Council; she led and advised an aldermanic campaign; and most recently, she is a regular commentator on a newly established program on WJOU titled The Millennials. Ms. Faulkner is a native Chicagoan who graduated from Kennedy-King College with an Associates in Political Science and later studied Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University in Washington D.C. and Chicago State University. She loves to volunteer and works tirelessly to improve the prospects of community youth. She currently serves on the board Kids off The Block a youth-based organization that works with at-risk youth to offer alternatives to gangs and drugs, started by her mom, a Top Ten CNN Hero, Diane Latiker. Ms. Faulkner has extensive experience in leadership development. She has worked with several non profits in training staff and young professionals in the area of leadership.

Ted Williams

Ted Williams

Chairman, Social Science Department at Kennedy-King College

Ted Williams, City Colleges of Chicago, Chairman of the Social Science Department at Kennedy-King College. Ted is a graduate of the University of Chicago (MPP Public Policy Analysis) and Rutgers University (B.A. Public Policy Analysis)

Ronnie Matthew Harris

Ronnie Matthew Harris

Founding Member, Sacred Roots

Based in Chicago, Ronnie is an experience speaker, counselor, and social entrepreneur. He has an uncanny knack for connecting people, places and things. As an experienced urban mission strategist, he’s devoted his life to seeing people flourish within the context of global cities. He’s the founding member of Sacred Roots, a community learning and development enterprise seeking to provide progressive alternatives of hope for those marginalized by historic, socio-economic barriers by creating innovative paths toward sustainable, equitable development through strategic partnerships. He is presently studying at University of Aberdeen; exploring the socio-economic intersections between race, religion, and culture in urban cities around the world. Recent projects have included, but are not limited to, the following: www.iamcampaign.com; www.gobronzeville.org; www.transitfuture.com

Dr. Amara Enyia

Dr. Amara Enyia

Public Policy Consultant, GSA Global Fellow

Dr. Enyia holds a Bachelor's degrees in Broadcast Journalism, Political Science, a law degree focusing on International law and development, a Masters Degree in Education and a PhD in Education Policy Studies.

Eli Williamson

Eli Williamson

Co-Founder, Leave No Veteran Behind

Co-Founder - Leave No Veteran Behind, former Veterans Program Director, Robert R. MCCormick Foundation, US Army, Psychological Operations Specialist - B.A., Communications & Linguistics, Luther College - M.A. - Depaul University, Non-Profit Management

Dr. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana

Dr. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana

Associate Director and Visiting Assistant Professor, Master of Arts Program in Conflict Resolution, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

Dr. S. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana is one of the founding members and the Associate Director of Salam Institute for Peace and Justice, a non-profit organization for research, education, and practice on issues related to conflict resolution, nonviolence, and development with a focus on bridging differences between Muslim and non-Muslim communities. Dr. Kadayifci-Orellana has facilitated dialogues and conflict resolution workshops between Israelis and Palestinians, conducted Islamic conflict resolution training workshops to imams and Muslim youth leaders in the United States, organized and participated in interfaith and intra-Muslim dialogues, and organized and participated in the first American-Muslim Delegation to Iran in November 2007. She has been invited to lecture at various international institutions, and conferences. She also served as a consultant to nonprofit development agencies: Center for International Environmental Law and CoDevelopment Canada, on various projects.

Susan Hayward

Susan Hayward

Senior Advisor, Religion and Inclusive Societies at the U.S. Institute of Peace, Washington, D.C.

Susan Hayward is a senior advisor for religion and inclusive societies at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Hayward directs the Institute’s efforts to advance conflict prevention, resolution and reconciliation projects engaging the religious sector. Since joining the Institute in 2007, her field work has focused on Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Colombia and Iraq. From 2010-2012 she coordinated an initiative exploring the intersection of women, religion, conflict and peacebuilding in partnership with the Berkley Center at Georgetown University and the World Faiths Development Dialogue. She co-edited a book on the topic entitled Women, Religion and Peacebuilding: Illuminating the Unseen. Her research interests include interfaith engagement in the midst of political violence, political Buddhism and the role of religion in hampering and propelling women’s work for peace and justice. She also serves on the international selection committee for the Niwano Peace Prize, which recognizes religious peacebuilders. Prior to joining the Institute, Hayward worked with the Academy of Educational Development’s office in Colombo, Sri Lanka, as a fellow of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and with the Conflict Resolution Program at the Carter Center in Atlanta. Hayward also conducted political asylum and refugee work with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and Advocates for Human Rights. Hayward studied Buddhism in Nepal and is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. She holds a bachelor's degree in comparative religions from Tufts University and master’s degrees from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and Harvard Divinity School. She is currently pursuing her doctorate in theology and religious studies at Georgetown University, focusing on Buddhist and Christian theological responses to authoritarianism and conflict in Myanmar.

Martine Miller

Martine Miller

Director, Asia and Gender for the Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers

Ms. Martine Miller is a mediator and conflict transformation specialist with over 18 years of engaged experience—with communities, government and UN agencies, regional bodies (i.e. EU, AU, ASEAN), and a range of inter/national non-governmental organizations coupled with academic institutions. Her work has engaged her directly in fluid war to post-war reconstruction and development contexts across over 75 countries in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, West to East Europe and North and South America. While engaged directly conducting/advising on conflict assessments, facilitating dialogues, designing, implementing and monitoring peace mediation, building processes to the evolution of networks and communities of practices across these fluid contexts, she works to consistently engage and build the capacity of youth civil society to ensure all processes include these vital stakeholders and evolve from specific local to national and regional contexts.  Ms. Miller derives her formal education linking practical mediation and conflict transformation knowledge and skills from a Masters in International Humanitarian and Human Rights Law, a Masters in Politics Post-war Reconstruction and Development, a dual Bachelors in Political Science and International Development, coupled with a range of specialized Certifications in Asian and African Studies, Mediation / Negotiation in War Contexts, Conflict Transformation, etc., as well as engagement in Harvard University’s Program on Negotiation and the International Committee for the Red Cross and Red Crescent (ICRC).  At current, Ms. Miller is a Director Asia (regional) and Gender (global) for the Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers. She also assists as a senior lecturer and advisor for Certificate students at the Peace and Conflict Studies Center at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand.

Rev. James Burklo

Rev. James Burklo

Associate Dean, Office of Religious Life at University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Reverend Jim Burklo is the Associate Dean of Religious Life at the University of Southern California. Reverend Burklo received his B.S. in Social Relations from UC Riverside, his M.Div. from San Francisco Theological Seminary, and his ministerial ordination from the United Church of Christ. He teaches a course in Public Policy at USC’s graduate School of Social Work, and a course in the Arts of Service at the USC Keck School of Medicine. For eight years, he served as the ecumenical Protestant minister for the United Campus Christian Ministry at Stanford University, where he supervised student projects, retreats, and internships related to spirituality and social justice. Reverend Burklo serves on the board of directors of Progressive Christians Uniting and is the author of six books – Open Christianity: Home by Another Road (2000), Birdlike and Barnless: Meditations, Prayers, Poems, and Songs for Progressive Christians (2008), Hitchhiking to Alaska: The Way of Soulful Service (2013), a novel, Souljourn (2013), Deeper Love: Faithful Rhetoric for Progressive Social Change (2016), and Mindful Christianity (to be published 2016). While at Stanford University, Reverend Burklo served as the vice-chair of the Community Working Group-Opportunity Center, which built a $24 million housing complex for Palo Alto’s homeless residents. Reverend Burklo previously served as the Executive Director of the Urban Ministry of Palo Alto (now part of InnVision Shelter Network, Inc), an interfaith non-profit cooperation serving thousands of homeless people annually. He was also the Associate Director of the Ecumenical Hunger Program, an interfaith hunger relief agency based in East Palo Alto. Reverend Burklo is the former pastor of Sausalito Presbyterian Church, a church characterized by its progressive theology and creative liturgy. He is also the former pastor of College Heights Church, San Mateo, CA, a church distinguished by its commitment to spiritual growth through interfaith exploration.

Dr. Diane Winston

Dr. Diane Winston

Professor of Media and Religion, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Diane Winston is a national authority on religion and the media as both a journalist and a scholar. Her expertise includes religion, politics and the news media as well as religion and the entertainment media. Professor Winston’s current research interests are religion and the entertainment media, media coverage of Islam and of changing Christianities, and the role of religion in American identity. Winston’s courses examine religion, spirituality and ethics in relationship to journalism, entertainment media, American history and foreign policy. Her class on international religion reporting has taken students to cover conflict and coexistence in Israel and Palestine, growing secularism in Ireland http://trans-missions.org/ireland/, and elections in India http://trans-missions.org/india2014/. In addition to partnering with Global Post and KPCC, she has helped students place their work in outlets including the Washington Post, the Jerusalem Post, Der Spiegel, Christian Science Monitor, the Los Angeles Times and the Atlantic.Winston received a Ph.D. in Religion from Princeton University. She also holds Master’s degrees from Harvard Divinity School, the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and Brandeis University.

Dr. Stephanie Varnon-Hughes

Dr. Stephanie Varnon-Hughes

Director of Cross-Cultural & Interfaith Programs, Claremont Lincoln University, Claremont, CA

Stephanie Varnon-Hughes, Ph.D., is the Director of Cross-Cultural & Interfaith Programs at Claremont Lincoln University, and an award winning teacher and interfaith leader whose research interests include the history, theories, and practices of inter-religious education, mindfulness and compassion practices, public policy (especially regarding inequities in public education), and how digital and online resources can make education accessible and learner-focused. She holds a Ph.D. from Claremont Lincoln University, an M.A. and S.T.M. from Union Theological Seminary and her undergraduate degrees are in English and Education, from Webster University.

Dr. Richard Meadows

Dr. Richard Meadows

Associate Professor, Foreign Languages Department at Berea College, Berea, KY

Associate Professor, Foreign Languages Department (French Program) , Berea College. M.A. Candidate, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, concentration in Diplomacy, minor in Development.

Ali Crawford

Ali Crawford

M.A. Candidate, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

M.A. Candidate, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, concentration in Diplomacy, minor in Intelligence.

Andrew Quirk

Andrew Quirk

M.A. Candidate, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

M.A. Candidate, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, concentration in International Commerce, minor in Development.

Dr. Robert Farley

Dr. Robert Farley

Associate Professor, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Robert Farley, Senior Lecturer, has worked at the Patterson School since 2005. He received his B.A. from the University of Oregon and his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Washington. He is the author of Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force, The Battleship Book, and an extensive array of articles on airpower, maritime strategy, and national security affairs. His research investigates the diffusion of military technology and ideas across the international system. Dr. Farley teaches courses and seminars on defense and national security.

Dr. Gregg Hall

Dr. Gregg Hall

Associate Professor at Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky

Gregg Hall, associate professor, joined the Patterson School in 2016. His areas of teaching and expertise include international relations and security, foreign policy, international political economy, Eurasian affairs, and, research methodology. Prior to joining the Patterson School, Dr. Hall served as Head of the Department of Political Science and Director of the International Studies Program at Morehouse College. His most recent book is titled Authority, Ascendancy, and Supremacy: China, Russia, and the United States’ Pursuit of Relevancy and Power. Hall completed his Ph.D. in Political Science, with a concentration in International Relations from Howard University.

Dr. Han S. Park

Dr. Han S. Park

Founding Director, Center for the Study of Global Issues (GLOBIS)
Professor Emeritus University of Georgia
Distinguished Professor, Claremont Lincoln University

Throughout his life, Han Park has endeavored to find new ways to use his talents and abilities to serve humankind. Dr. Park has focused his research on the issues of human rights, sustainable development, and East Asian politics. Included in his extensive list of publications are Human Needs and Political Development (1984), China and North Korea (co-authored, 1990), North Korea: Ideology, Politics, Economy (edited, 1996), North Korea: The Politics of Unconventional Wisdom (2002), and North Korea Demystified (2012).

James Patton

James Patton

President, International Center for Religion & Diplomacy

James Patton has conducted international development, conflict transformation and social reconciliation for over two decades in more than a dozen countries, building collaborative networks and programs with the entire range of social and political actors in complex conflict environments. His non-governmental experience includes assessing the impact of drug policies and military responses in Bolivia, training Cambodian Buddhists on their role in post-conflict stability, and coordinating citizen security and conflict transformation efforts in the Andean region.

His governmental experience includes working with the Special Envoy for Sudan, leading stability operations assessments for the US State Department in South Sudan, and enhancing the Latin America and Religion and Conflict portfolios for USAID’s Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation.

In his role as ICRD’s President, James serves as a member of a number of collaborative efforts to advance the field of peacemaking, including: the U.S. Department of State’s Working Group on Religion and Foreign Policy; the Council on Foreign Relations’ Religion and Foreign Policy Working Group, and; the public-private partnership advancing national dialogue on reconciliation in Colombia, Reconcilación Colombia. He is a Senior Visiting Fellow at Brigham Young University’s Wheatley Institution and the co-author, with Rev. David Steele, of the forthcoming U.S. Institute of Peace publication, Religion and Conflict Guide: Religion and Reconciliation.

James holds a Master of Law and Diplomacy degree from The Fletcher School at Tufts University and a Master of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School. He has taught and lectured widely, and is fluent in Spanish, with practical experience in a number of other languages. He and his wife, Andrea, have a creative six-year old daughter, Gabriela, and a jovial two-year old son, Simon.

Kay Lindahl

Kay Lindahl

Founder, The Listening Center
Author, The Sacred Art of Listening

Kay Lindahl has been described as an inspired presence with passionate energy. For the past twenty years the daily practice of Centering Prayer has been transforming her life. She founded The Listening Center with the mission of exploring the sacred nature of listening. She conducts workshops and retreats on listening as a spiritual practice. She is a Certified Listening Professional. Kay participates in many community projects and is on the Board of Directors for The Immortal Chaplains Foundation and for Women of Spirit and Faith. She is an Ambassador for the Parliament of the World's Religions. Kay is a past trustee of theGlobal Council for the United Religions Initiative, an international movement to create peace among religions and is Past Chair of the North American Interfaith Network. She is a dedicated spokesperson for the interfaith movement, is ordained interfaith minister and an Honorary Canon to the Cathedral Center of St. Paul in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles.

Kay is the author for The Sacred Art of Listening, Practicing the Sacred Art of Listening and How Does God Listen? published by SkyLight Paths Publishing, “The Art of Dialogue and Centering Prayer” in The Diversity of Centering Prayer, published by Continuum Press and "Listening" in In Times Like These, published by Church Publishing Incorporated. She also co-edited Women, Spirituality and Transformative Leadership: Where Grace Meets Power published by SkyLight Paths Publishing.

Kay serves on the Program Group for Ecumenical and Interreligious Life for the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. She is a member of the Forge Guild for Spiritual Leaders and The International Listening Association.

Lindahl has presented her work in diverse settings—local, regional, national and international. Locally she has created programs, board retreats and ongoing series of workshops for congregations as well as inservice training for non-profit organizations and lectures on college campuses. In addition she presents programs on Listening and Diversity for major corporations. Regional, national and international presentations include:

  • Verizon, APEX
  • Northrup Grumman
  • Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles
  • VA Greater Los Angeles Health Care System
  • San Bernardino Water District
  • Interfaith Center at the Presidio in San Francisco
  • Mt. Calvary Retreat Center in Santa Barbara
  • Chautauqua Institute in New York State
  • Episcopal Theological School at Claremont
  • 1999 and 2004 Parliaments of the World’s Religions
  • World Wide Listening Day, Stratford, Canada
  • CSU Los Angeles, UC Irvine, CSU, Fullerton, Occidental College
  • Thomas Merton Society of Canada
  • Earl Lectures, Pacific Divinity School
  • Providence Center for Spirituality, Spokane, WA and Lubbock, TX
  • Intercultural Communication Institute
  • Immaculate Heart Community

She is a summa cum laude graduate of Pepperdine University.

Kay and her husband live in Long Beach, CA, where they are often visited by their children and ten grandchildren.

Daisy Kahn

Daisy Khan

Executive Director of the Women’s Islamic Initiative for Spirituality and Equality (WISE)

Daisy Khan is Executive Director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA), a New York based non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening an expression of Islam based on cultural and religious harmony, as well as building bridges between Muslims and the general public. At ASMA, Daisy Khan has created a number of groundbreaking intra- and inter-faith programs. She has led numerous interfaith events, such as the theater production, Same Difference, and the Cordoba Bread Fest Banquet. She continues to mentor American Muslims on assimilation issues, balancing faith and modernity, the challenges of living as a minority, and intergenerational questions. To strengthen the voices of women and youth within the global Muslim community, she created two cutting-edge programs of international scope: Muslim Leaders of Tomorrow (MLT) and the Women’s Islamic Initiative in Spirituality and Equality (WISE).

Khan regularly lectures in the United States and internationally. She has appeared on numerous media outlets, such as CNN, Al Jazeera, and BBC World’s Doha Debates.  She often serves as an adviser and contributor to a variety of documentaries, including PBS’s Muhammad: Legacy of a Prophet, National Geographic’s Inside Mecca, and the Hallmark Channel’s Listening to Islam. Khan is a weekly contributor to the Washington Post’s “On Faith” blog and is frequently quoted in print publications, such as Time Magazine, Newsweek, Chicago Tribune, The New York Times, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Saudi Gazette, and the Khaleej Times.  Born in Kashmir, she spent twenty-five years as an interior architect for various Fortune 500 companies. In 2005, she dedicated herself to full-time community service and building movements for positive change, both in the United States and around the globe. In recognition of this important work, Khan is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Interfaith Center’s Award for Promoting Peace and Interfaith Understanding, Auburn Seminary’s Lives of Commitment Award, and the Annual Faith Leaders Award. She was also selected by Women’s eNews as one of the 21 Leaders for the 21st Century.

Partners

Patterson School
University of Kentucky
Oakwood University
The Center for Adventist-Muslim Relations
Morehouse College
Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel at Morehouse College
Global Strategist Association
Georgetown University
University of Southern California - Office of Religious Life

Presenting Institutions

  • Alabama A&M University
  • Berea College
  • City Colleges of Chicago
  • Georgetown University – The Berkley Center and The M.A. Program in Conflict Resolution
  • Global Strategists Association
  • Institute of Signifying Scriptures
  • International Center for Religion & Diplomacy
  • Kennedy-King College
  • Leave No Veteran Behind
  • Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel at Morehouse College
  • Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers
  • Oakwood University
  • Oakwood University – Center for Adventist-Muslim Relations
  • Sacred Roots
  • The Listening Center
  • United States Institute of Peace
  • University of Alabama, Huntsville
  • University of Georgia – GLOBIS
  • University of Kentucky – Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
  • University of Southern California – The Annenberg School of Communication and The Journalism and Office of Religious Life